X-Ray FAQs

X-Ray is available in the following locations:

  • Dundrum
  • Northwood
  • Cork
  • Kilkenny
1. Are X Rays safe? Can I have an X Ray if I am pregnant?

It may not be possible to have an X-ray if you are pregnant. This depends on the type of X-ray that you need to have as the levels of radiation exposure vary. Even though the risk to your baby is considered low, it is likely that your GP will advise you to postpone any unnecessary X-rays until after giving birth.

2. What are the most common uses for an X Ray?

An X-ray is most commonly used to provide a medical professional with further information on your condition. The most common forms of X-ray are chest or spine X-rays.

3. Do I need to prepare for an X Ray?

Most X-Rays require no special preparation. You may be asked to remove some or all of your clothing and to wear a gown during the examination. You may also be asked to remove jewellery which might interfere with the X-Ray images.

4. What happens during the X Ray?

You will be asked to lie on a table or stand against a surface so that the part of your body being imaged is between the X-Ray machine and the imaging plate (similar to a photo-graphic film). You will have to keep still so the image is not blurred.

5. How long will the X Ray take?

The examination will take approximately 10-15 minutes.

6. How do I get the results?

The radiologist will analyse the scan and a report will be issued to your referring clinician within 24 hours of the scan taking place.

X-Ray

What is an X Ray?

An X-Ray is the oldest and most frequently used form of medical imaging. It is a painless medical scan that is used to produce an internal image of an area of the body to assist in the diagnosis of many medical conditions.

Xray

 

X Ray FAQs

 

1. Are X Rays safe? Can I have an X Ray if I am pregnant?

It may not be possible to have an X-ray if you are pregnant. This depends on the type of X-ray that you need to have as the levels of radiation exposure vary. Even though the risk to your baby is considered low, it is likely that your GP will advise you to postpone any unnec-essary X-rays until after giving birth.

2. What are the most common uses for an X Ray?

An X-ray is most commonly used to provide a medical professional with further information on your condition. The most common forms of X-ray are chest or spine X-rays.

3. Do I need to prepare for an X Ray?

Most X-Rays require no special preparation. You may be asked to remove some or all of your clothing and to wear a gown during the examination. You may also be asked to remove jewellery which might interfere with the X-Ray images.

4. What happens during the X Ray?

You will be asked to lie on a table or stand against a surface so that the part of your body being imaged is between the X-Ray machine and the imaging plate (similar to a photo-graphic film). You will have to keep still so the image is not blurred.

5. How long will the X Ray take?

The examination will take approximately 10-15 minutes.

6. How do I get the results?

The radiologist will analyse the scan and a report will be issued to your referring clinician within 24 hours of the scan taking place.